Sustainable vegetable and chicken farming

CHICKEN FARMING IN MALAWI, AFRICA

Developing from the work that has been achieved with the fruit tree project, we are teaching the Community Clubs how to efficiently set up small-scale farming businesses. They achieve this from three packets of vegetable seeds and business training.

Mothers at Under Five clinic talk about family planning in Malawi

Problems

  • Rapid population growth and large families
  • Poor diets and significant levels of malnutrition
  • Low availability of protein sources in local markets
  • High levels of poverty with few opportunities to generate an income
Community club members hold three of the chickens they are raising in Malawi

solutions

  • Provide community clubs with vegetable seeds
  • Educate them on growing vegetables and selling at market 
  • Teach them basic business skills to start their chicken business
  • Ongoing support as they establish and expand their farming business 

Vegetables and chickens in Malawi, Africa

Achievements and Future Plans

We support 100 community clubs to grow vegetables and sell them at market so that they can start their chicken business.

We will continue to support each community group for two years to ensure they have the necessary training and understanding to make their farms successful.

How We Work

We work with the Community Fruit Tree Clubs to diversify their knowledge from growing fruit trees to setting up these farming businesses.

We provide each Club with three packets of vegetable seeds. They grow the vegetables and from the harvest of two packets, they sell these vegetables at market. The harvest from the third packet is eaten by the Club members’ families.

After selling the vegetables at market, the Club members are taught basic finance and business skills to start a small chicken business. They buy 10 chicks, feed and vaccines and after six weeks, are able to sell the chickens.

From the initial income made from selling vegetables, they reinvest this by buying chickens which are then sold and more chickens are purchased. Some of the Community Clubs are now saving the profit to develop their business further by buying and rearing pigs.

£10 can provide a Community Club with vegetable seeds

Farmers stand by thier vegetable garden in Malawi

fURTHER INFORMATION

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Developing from the work that Maston has achieved with the fruit tree project, we are now teaching the Community Clubs how to efficiently set up small-scale farming businesses.

This project complements the fruit tree and improved orange-fleshed sweet potatoes project by improving access to more nutritious foods.

In Malawi, malnutrition is a major cause of death among children, and poor diet can lead to general ill health and disease. Many people in Malawi go hungry and survive only on a staple carbohydrate called nsima (a porridge made from either maize or cassava), severely lacking many of the important vitamins and minerals. By ensuring there is access to a sustainable protein source in the community will help improve the health of rural families.

Lastly, through this project the community club members are able to raise an income and provide for their families. The value of access to a sustainable income stream for a poor rural family cannot be underestimated!

We currently support 100 community clubs who are growing fruit trees but are now learning how to grow vegetables and setup chicken businesses too.

We work with the Community Fruit Tree Clubs to diversify their knowledge from growing fruit trees to setting up these farming businesses.

We provide each Club with three packets of vegetable seeds. They grow the vegetables and from the harvest of two packets, they sell these vegetables at market. The harvest from the third packet is eaten by the Club members’ families.

After selling the vegetables at market, the Club members are taught basic finance and business skills to start a small chicken business. They buy 10 chicks, feed and vaccines and after six weeks, are able to sell the chickens.

From the initial income made from selling vegetables, they reinvest this by buying chickens which are then sold and more chickens are purchased. Some of the Community Clubs are now saving the profit to develop their business further by buying and rearing pigs.

The additional benefit of raising animals is that they can use the droppings to make Mbeya manure for using when planting their fruit trees.

The Community Clubs have been taught how to make it and have seen how much of an impact the manure can have, not only growing their fruit trees but other crops too.

We will continue to support the existing community groups to setup and maintain their businesses.

We will provide additional training as and when they wish to establish pig farms.

This project addresses the following Sustainable Development Goals: